Big Cans Drive Sales Growth for No-Li Brewhouse and Others

19.2-ounce cans of beer from No-Li Brewhouse.

The struggles are real, but there is always hope. There are always things to learn from success. No-Li Brewhouse provides us with some good stuff to report regarding beer sales. “Small but increasingly mighty in its neck of the woods, Spokane-based No-Li is off to a hot start in 2024 and is now the #18 brewery in America in absolute [dollar] growth on the back of 30% gains,” said a report from Beer Marketer’s Insights (BMI), a trusted publication reporting on the beer industry.

BMI says that a key driver of No-Li’s success is its portfolio of 19.2-ounce cans, which now ranks third nationally in sales velocity among craft offerings, trailing only New Belgium and San Tan but outpacing Sierra Nevada. In Eastern Washington, No-Li leads the segment with a 43% share of craft 19.2-ounce sales. Think about that for a second: 43% of craft beer in 19.2-oz cans sold in that region is a lot of beer.

Big cans of beer from No-Li Brewhouse.

To put this in context, across the nation craft beer sales have struggled for the past couple of years. This is especially true in traditional retail outlets, like grocery stores. The reports come from multiple sources, like the National Beer Wholesalers Association, the Beer Institute, IRI scan data, and others. At the same time, No-Li Brewhouse and a small handful of other craft breweries are trending in a different direction.

The 19.2-ounce cans are an important part of the equation. Again, context. Over the past two or three years craft beer sales struggled at mainstream retail outlets, but on the national stage, New Belgian Brewing provided a bright spot. The company’s Voodoo Ranger family of beers soared in popularity (sales) and drove the company’s larger success. Those beers, imperial IPAs at or above 9% ABV, are widely available in 19.2-ounce cans. Big cans of strong beer are particularly popular at convenience stores. Craft beer enthusiasts probably don’t shop for beer that way, but nationwide many people do.


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Cans of beer, the Voodoo Ranger family of beers from New Belgium Brewing.

In 2022 and 2023, beer sales generally struggled for everyone in every market, but New Belgium hugely bucked the trend. We shouldn’t ignore what the Voodoo Ranger family of beers is up to. Just over a year ago, New Belgium introduced Fruit Force Imperial IPA. Almost immediately it took the world by storm and quickly ranked among the top 30 craft beer brands in IRI multi-outlet + convenience channels (IRI MULC). Don’t ignore that kind of success. Yes, I know that most craft breweries cannot do what New Belgium does with its deep pockets and vast distribution network, but we can all observe and learn.

Meanwhile, back to No-Li Brewhouse and its recent achievements. Beer Marketer’s Insights points out that in its core markets of Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho, No-Li has solidified its position as the top craft brand family, boasting an 18% market share and emerging as the largest absolute dollar gainer. This growth is mirrored in Western Washington, with a 35% increase and a 16% rise in statewide tracked scans.


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A key driver of No-Li’s success is its portfolio of 19.2-ounce cans, which now ranks third nationally in sales velocity among craft offerings. In Eastern Washington, No-Li leads the segment with a 43% share of craft 19.2-ounce sales. (Those cans are pictured at the top of this post.)

“No-Li continues to climb, fueled by our commitment to quality and community,” said John Bryant, founder of No-Li Brewhouse. “Our growth is a testament to the hard work of our team and the support of our loyal customers. We’re excited to see what the rest of 2024 brings.”

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These days, when reporting on the craft beer industry, it is easy to find stories about the struggles. It is more challenging to find stories that provide hope and agency. I am happy to report the latter whenever I see it. I don’t do it to provide a call to action or to point anyone down a particular path; rather, it’s just something for everyone trying to sell beer these days to consider.


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