Anheuser-Busch introduces Bud Light Next, a stunning achievement



A bit of a diversion for those of you who know me to always be so craft-focused and entirely serious.

You are going to hear about this sooner than later, so you might as well hear about it from me. This Sunday when the world tunes in to watch the big sportsball game, A-B intends to spend a few dollars spreading the word about Bud Light NEXT. Anheuser-Busch has introduced a zero-carb beer, 4 percent ABV, and 80 calories per 12-ounce serving.

A beer with no carbs? That is remarkable. The scientists who created Bud Light NEXT must be very proud. More importantly, Bud Light achieved its ultimate goal: Bud Light NEXT tastes like nothing at all, or so I’m told.


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For years, Bud Light has filled a very important niche in the beer world. It appeals to people who want their beer to taste as much like nothing as possible. I mean no disrespect when I say that. Some of us drink beer because of the flavor, while others drink beer despite the flavor. For the latter, Anheuser-Busch’s new creation is some kind of blessed miracle.

Here are a few examples of what real users have said about Bud Light NEXT on UnTappd:


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  • “Might as well drink water…” Robb W.
  • “I get plain seltzer water with zero beer flavor.” Phil V.
  • “Tastes like carbonated water.” Brennan N.
  • “What in the ungodly hell is this abomination?” Cody S.
  • “This is scary.” Kelly D.

I have exactly one friend who has tried Bud Light NEXT. He knows a couple things about good beer and simply said, “It’s water.”

How did Anheuser-Busch make something it calls beer without using any carb-creating grains? They are being tight-lipped about it, which is understandable. Apparently, they spent 10 years developing whatever it is that they do to create a zero-carb beer. I’m told the label says something about natural flavors and fruit. So there’s that.


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On a more serious note, this seems an example of the beer behemoth’s new approach. Instead of continuing to try and edge its way into the craft beer market by acquiring beloved and respected craft breweries and immediately rendering them once-beloved and once-respected, they are focusing on identifying consumer markets and introducing innovative, new products to satisfy those shoppers. In this case, the company says that Bud Light NEXT is geared toward health-conscious millennials between the ages of 21 and 27. This particular demographic has¬†shown a greater preference¬†for drinks with reduced alcoholic content and, presumably, less flavor.

I know that most people who read this forum will never go anywhere near Bud Light NEXT, but you are all going to hear about it. Ten years of research and development costs a lot of money and it is very likely that Anheuser-Busch is going to use its billion-dollar marketing budget to push this one down your throat.

Again, I honestly mean no disrespect when I say this. In some weird, ironic way, I see value in making a beer that tastes like nothing at all. Apparently Bud Light NEXT is pretty damned close to achieving that goal.



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1 thought on “Anheuser-Busch introduces Bud Light Next, a stunning achievement

  1. So, after reading this story, I’m reminded of “stories” in the preceding weeks about how “young people” are drinking more low alcohol beverages and ones with “lighter” flavor. These stories made the rounds and I just couldn’t rap my head around them. “Lighter flavor” what the heck was that?

    Then this story shows up about Bud Light Next and the light comes on and I realize that those previous stories probably came from the Anheuser-Busch propaganda… sorry, PR department. Priming the pump, so to speak, that young folks like flavorless alcoholic beverages.

    Riiiiiight…

    I’d wager that the “filtering process” is really just taking neutral spirits and diluting them to about 4% ABV. Yes, the spirits came from “beer” that they brewed, then distilled. It’s all in the wording.

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